Collaborative Online Learning Using a Blended Learning Design for a Physiology Course in Nursing Education

Authors

  • Reidun Lid Assistant Professor, Faculty of Health Studies, VID Specialized University, Oslo
  • Simen Alexander Steindal Associate Professor, Lovisenberg Diaconal Universitu College, Oslo, Norway
  • Hanne Maria Bingen Assistant Professor, Faculty of Health Studies, VID Specialized University, Norway

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.7577/seminar.3599

Abstract

Background: This paper is based on implementation of Salmon’s model for online collaborative learning in a blended learning context for part-time nursing students at a Norwegian university.

Objectives: The aim of this study was to explore and describe students’ experiences and to assess the relevance of Salmon’s model applied in a blended learning course in physiology.

Methods: The study used a qualitative descriptive design. Data were collected from students enrolled in a physiology course in 2011 and 2012. Qualitative data came from survey and focus group interviews. 

Findings: Three themes emerged from this study: participation in both steps of the two-step design is important but challenging; online socialisation and a sense of group community support student participation and learning in group e-tivities; and the students’ perception of responsibility when collaborating online.

Conclusions: The teacher’s facilitation of online socialisation, participation, collaboration, feedback and intervention promoted a sense of community and was crucial for the students’ learning of physiology. However, a lack of confidence concerning professional physiology knowledge led to a greater dependency on the teacher than Salmon’s model suggests. The model may have limited potential in physiology, which requires causal reasoning. We suggest combining Salmon’s asynchronous model with synchronous activities.

 

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Published

2021-04-16

How to Cite

Lid, R., Steindal, S. A., & Bingen, H. M. . (2021). Collaborative Online Learning Using a Blended Learning Design for a Physiology Course in Nursing Education. Seminar.net, 17(01). https://doi.org/10.7577/seminar.3599

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Articles