Revisiting the past: human rights education and epistemic justice

Authors

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.7577/hrer.4486

Abstract

Epistemic injustice in human rights education (HRE) can be found in a colonial historical trajectory of human rights that rests on accounts of western agency only. Such narratives overshadow the legacy of Indian and Pakistani freedom fighters and Latin American feminists who negotiated human rights against colonial, patriarchal and racist discourses after the Second World War. Without their contribution a United Nations (UN) rights concept risked being limited to a western trajectory of the ‘Rights of Man’ that represents a monistic universalism. The paper revisits the history of the United Nations, unearthing historical counternarratives of what a pluralistic universalism of human rights means by adding knowledge about postcolonial feminist subjects who spoke of a positive conception that could reduce injustice.

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Author Biography

Rebecca Adami, Stockholm University, Sweden

Senior Lecturer

Department of Education

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Published

2021-10-13

How to Cite

Adami, R. (2021). Revisiting the past: human rights education and epistemic justice . Human Rights Education Review. https://doi.org/10.7577/hrer.4486